running

Where should you look when running?

Consequences of running and looking down!

We have become accustomed to keeping our eyes down when walking or running or even when we are just chilling on the couch scrolling on the socials!
Keeping the eyes down has become hardwired in our brains because of the use of electronic devices cell phones etc.
We no longer look up! There are barely any advertisements on billboards anymore since we now see those ads on our phones.
Due to covid, we have become much more accustomed to staying indoors and because of lockdown, we look at our devices like no tomorrow.
Eyes looking down while walking has tremendous neurological consequences that REFLEXIVELY ruin our postures, our muscle tension and pain levels.
When eyes look down, a portion of the brain called the Midbrain is being activated via 2 nerves located within it called the Oculomotor and the Trochlear Nerve.
The nerves are responsible for looking close and down (motor movement). Once the midbrain is activated for long periods of time with eyes looking down:
• The sympathetic (fight or flight) nervous system is kept on high alert. The sympathetic nervous system LIVES in the midbrain
• Flexor Tone increases giving you rounded shoulders and upper back
• Ruins Upright Posture
• Decreases posterior chain musculature activity: decreased hip extension, altered arm swing
• Increases breathing challenges due to stress on the diaphragm
Imagine now what the after effects of all this can do when you’re not running such as stress and anxiety throughout the day, poor sleep quality, poor recovery from training, etc.
So it may be a small detail to you but BIG when it comes to the nervous system and human performance!
Next time you get a stroll in, LOOK UP!!!
Keep those eyes in the horizon!! Breath through your nose ONLY no matter how hard it is, it’s a habit that needs to be trained.
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running
running

Please leave a comment below if you have any questions or alternatively click on the links below.

If you’d like to know more about Myotherapy you may click here alternatively if you’d like to try Myotherapy and book an appointment click here.

Jayden Seracino | Director at MyoActive

Dry-Needling

What is Dry Needling?

Dry Needling:

Do you have tight muscles, painful joints or trigger points, headaches, or other pain issues? If so, maybe your practitioner has suggested dry needling to treat your pain.

Dry needling is the insertion of fine filament needles into the body, with the goal of decreasing pain and spasms. There are many conditions and symptoms that can be treated with dry needling. 

As stated above, dry needling is defined as the insertion of small needles into the human body to treat pain, “trigger points”, and soreness. There are many methods of delivery, and one must receive adequate training on how to implement this safely and effectively. 

Before receiving dry needling, you will want to make sure you are an appropriate candidate and that you have been screened for any health conditions that may prevent treatment from being safe & effective. Finding a highly trained, educated, and qualified therapist can help you do just that!

There is an extensive amount of musculoskeletal conditions that can be treated with dry needling. Patients with pain syndromes, neuromusculoskeletal disorders, and movement impairment syndromes can all benefit from treatment. Simple muscle tightness, strains and sprains, an overworked body needing recovery, muscle activation, swelling reduction, and pain modulation are all examples of clinical use of dry needling. 

Dry needling is a tool utilized during treatment and it has been demonstrated to be most effective when COMBINED with therapeutic exercise and manual techniques from a myotherapist. Dry needling is a ‘tool in the toolbox’, if you will, to treat acute and chronic pain syndromes.

Please leave a comment below if you have any questions or alternatively click on the links below.

If you’d like to know more about Myotherapy you may click here alternatively if you’d like to try Myotherapy and book an appointment click here.

Jayden Seracino | Director at MyoActive

Dry Needling
Massage Burwood

Bad backs are costing Australia!

Bad backs costing us big bucks due to chronic and acute back pain.

More money was spent on musculoskeletal disorders, such as osteoarthritis and back pain, than any other disease, condition or injury in Australia, suggests a new report from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).

The report, Disease expenditure in Australia 2018-19, looks at how $136 billion was spent across the health system in 2018–19. This represented 73% of recurrent health spending ($185 billion) (the remainder is unable to be attributed to specific diseases or injuries largely due to data limitations).

The report provides analysis of where health spending is directed in terms of the conditions and diseases that attract the spending, whether the spending occurs in or outside hospitals and which age groups attract the most spending.

‘Overall, musculoskeletal disorders attracted the most spending at $14 billion, followed by cardiovascular diseases ($11.8 billion), cancer and other neoplasms ($11.8 billion), and mental and substance use disorders ($10.5 billion),’ said AIHW spokesperson Dr. Adrian Webster.

For admitted patients in public hospitals, cardiovascular diseases accounted for $4.4 billion in spending, followed by injury and gastrointestinal disorders at $3.8 billion each.

In private hospitals, the disease groups with the highest spending were musculoskeletal disorders ($4.9 billion), cardiovascular diseases ($2.5 billion) and cancer and other neoplasms ($2.5 billion).

In primary health care settings, oral disorders accounted for $7.8 billion in spending, followed by mental and substance use disorders ($4.2 billion), and cancer and other neoplasms ($3.7 billion).

‘As we age, spending on our health generally increases – the highest spending was for those aged 70–74 and the lowest for those aged 5–9 years,’

‘For males, the bulk of spending tends to occur later in life. However, spending for females between the ages of 20 to 45 is substantially higher than for males, largely due to spending on birth and reproduction related conditions,’ said Dr. Webster.

This release accompanies a recent release from the AIHW, Australian Burden of Disease Study 2018 – Key findings, which provides insight into the conditions that place the greatest burden on the community. Coronary heart disease, back pain, dementia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer were the five diseases causing the most burden in 2018.

Together these releases and the data they contain represent a rich resource for understanding the relationships between disease burden, population ageing and health spending.

Find out what myotherapists treat?

Myotherapists provide evidence-based assessment, treatment and rehabilitation for a wide range of musculoskeletal pain and associated conditions, for example:

  1. Back pain
  2. Neck and shoulder pain
  3. Headache
  4. Sports injuries
  5. Rotator cuff problems
  6. Occupational injuries
  7. Achilles tendinopathy and other ankle injuries
  8. Jaw pain and clicking
  9. Fibromyalgia and other chronic pain presentations
  10. Tennis elbow
  11. Post Surgery issues
  12. Knee pain
  13. Hip pain
  14. Fibromyalgia
  15. Chronic pain

You don’t need to be in pain to visit a Myotherapist. Once symptoms have settled treatment may focus on restoring optimal activity (rehabilitation), reducing the likelihood of further injury and keeping you moving and performing at your best.

back pain
Closeup rear low angle view of an early 60’s senior gentleman having some back pain. He’s examination by a myotherapist. The patient is pointing to his lumbar region.

We all know that myotherapy can have an impact on a patient’s biopsychosocial health. Our head myotherapist worked alongside the AFL and professional athletes to assist them in competiting at the highest level with minimal pain and/or discomfort.

Please leave a comment below if you have any questions or alternatively click on the links below.

If you’d like to know more about Myotherapy you may click here alternatively if you’d like to try Myotherapy and book an appointment click here.

Jayden Seracino | Director at MyoActive

Osteopathy Burwood

Back Pain Solution, what you can do for yourself!

Back Pain Solution, what you need to know today!

Missing long term solutions for your low back pain?

Are you being taught what YOU can do for your low back pain? .  

Adjustments, massage, soft tissue work, acupuncture, dry needling, stretching, e-stim, decompression the list goes on! What do all of these things have in common? They don’t teach you what you can do for yourself. Sure, are there situations where they could be helpful? No doubt, of course they can!

But if you are NOT ultimately being taught what you can do for yourself then you have to rely on these passive therapies forever. What happens if you are out of town and your low back goes out?

What happens if you are on vacation and pain returns? What do you do then? This is not a long term solution, at MyoActive we provide a long term solutation to your lower back pain!  

The key here is that you must be taught how to take control of your own low back. You must learn what you can do for yourself for true independence and freedom so that you are not reliant on any of these other passive therapies and you are not reliant on any doctors! My goal is always for my online and face to face low back clients to never need me again because they are the expert now!

If you are not being taught why your low back hurts, why we are doing certain exercises, why they are helping, and how to implement them on your own in your future…. Then you don’t have a long term plan!! Send me a email or contact us if you are ready to get rid of low back issues the right way. Now let’s fix your low back! . 

Want to fix your low back 1-on-1 with me?

I help people with low back issues recover without drugs or surgery through 1:1 face to face coaching! 

Please leave a comment below if you have any questions or alternatively click on the links below.

If you’d like to know more about Myotherapy you may click here alternatively if you’d like to try Myotherapy and book an appointment click here.

Jayden Seracino | Director at MyoActive

back pain
Closeup rear low angle view of an early 60’s senior gentleman having some back pain. He’s getting examination by a myotherapist. The patient is pointing to his lumbar region.
aches and pains

Myotherapy and Massage, what’s the difference?

Myotherapy and Massage, what you need to know today!

Myotherapy and massage are two distinct professions, with different aims and objectives, health fund rebates, and are different educational pathways.

Though massage may be common with physiotherapists, osteopaths and chiropractors, myotherapists differ in their application method.

A myotherapist offers a wider range of evidence-based treatment approaches in addition to massage, including;

-Dry needling

-Electro-therapeutic techniques

-Exercise prescription

-Education for individual pain management

-Education for load/activity modification, particularly useful for those with professions in trades, including hairdressers and active body builders

-Education for effective lifestyle pain management

Please leave a comment below if you have any questions or alternatively click on the links below.

If you’d like to know more about Myotherapy you may click here alternatively if you’d like to try Myotherapy and book an appointment click here.

Jayden Seracino | Director at MyoActive

Myotherapy and Massage
aches and pains

Winter Aches And Pains!

3 things you need to know about muscle and joint pain in Winter

It’s getting closer to winter, and lots of people complain about body aches and pains.
 
1. When weather changes, people’s injuries or joints tend to ache a little bit more. If they happen to have any precursor to arthritis or already have arthritis, that’s when we hear a lot of people complain that their joints are stiff, and that they tend to have more pain when they first start moving. Oftentimes, that’s pretty typical. Usually, when we’re a little older or have more injury under our belt, we’ll feel it a little bit more.
 
2. What tends to be most common is when we’re more sedentary. The first couple of movements when we get up out of a chair or when we’re getting out of bed, that tends to be when it’s the most sore. We just tend to be a little bit more inactive in the winter, so we tend to feel it a little bit more. 
 
3. Try to overdress rather than underdress because you can always remove a layer if you’re too hot. For those who suffer headaches, wrap your neck in a scarf. The warmth can help regulate blood flow and circulation around the body.

How can we help manage winter aches and pains?

Also with the cold, sometimes our joints just have a little bit less elasticity and the fact that we’re colder. When things are warmed up, they tend to have better stretch, and they don’t bind up on us as much. 
 
So we recommend that often times it’s just gentle, active motion.
If your knee hurts, before you get hurt and you’ve been sitting in a movie, it’s a good idea to just move your knees back and forth. 
 
 
Bend your knee back and forth before you stand up and get up. If you’re having trouble moving or gripping something with your hands, we ask that you just open and close your hands a little bit before you actually go to grab something. It’s things like that, that will help our bodies get a little bit more active and less sore.

What should I know about arthritis? 

Arthritis, in general, can promote weakness because we tend to not move because we’re sore. In the medical field, what we recommend is to try to strengthen those arthritic or stiff joints. The more we strengthen it, the muscles will take on the brute force, energy, of work that has to be done by that joint in that area, so that the muscles tend to do more of the work than the rubbing of the two joint surfaces together.

The less we’re moving or the colder it gets, the more tense we tend to be. If we’re sitting, for instance, at the computer all day and the cold air has been on, chances are our shoulders have been kind of creeping up and we’ve kind of been tensing our whole body up just because we’re cold, sore, tired, and stiff. 
 
So we recommend, actually, to relax your shoulders, try and get your body to move a little bit more, and spend less static time doing whatever it is that we’re doing. Oftentimes, we hear people complaining by spending too much at the computer, and we don’t break it up as much. 

At our clinic, we mainly focus on providing injury rehabilitation through various techniques of muscle strengthening and retraining.

We provide our services all around Melbourne and we have many clients from Glen Waverley, Mount Waverley, Burwood, Burwood East, Vermont, Forest Hill and more for Myotherapy services.

 

Can posture help reduce aches and pains?

Let’s talk a little bit about our posture when we think about our tightness, our aches, and our soreness in our upper body from the winter. I just picture in my mind someone kind of hunched at a computer. Their shoulders are raised. 
 
Their chin is kind of jutting out a little bit and kind of scrunched up in there. That stiffness, that kind of clenching of our muscles when you’re cold and fatigued is a problem. What we talk about doing is just lengthening your whole body, kind of pretending someone’s got that string on top of your head, pulling your body up, getting your shoulders down, lengthening your back, pulling your belly muscles in, squeezing your shoulder blades a little bit together to try and maintain better posture.
 
Hopefully, we can avoid getting those tight upper trapezius muscles right at the base of our neck and at the top of our shoulder.
Taking your shoulders and doing some shoulder rolls to just kind of loosen that area up is good. Things like that will help. And then just staying active in general such as going for a walk when you have that ten minute break and spending time in the hallways, in the stairs in your house, moving around a little bit more and being less sedentary.
 
Think about what you have been doing for the last hour or so and see how you can change that so that you can have overall better posture and enjoy your body and your life a little bit more.

Please leave a comment below if you have any questions or alternatively click on the links below.

If you’d like to know more about Myotherapy you may click here alternatively if you’d like to try Myotherapy and book an appointment click here.

Jayden Seracino | Director at MyoActive

aches and pains
Massage Burwood

What Is Myotherapy and 3 things you need to know!

3 things you need to know about Myotherapy

Myotherapy is a client-centred healthcare profession focusing on the assessment, treatment and management of the whole person, applying a range of modalities and evidence-informed knowledge to support client outcomes.

Myotherapy uses clinical reasoning, manual hands-on therapy, problem solving and planning skills to design and implement treatment and management programs specific to client needs and health outcomes.

Treatment applications may include, however are not limited to, dry needling, exercise and rehabilitation planning, massage therapy and joint mobilisation.

Myotherapy treatments can assist and aid in prevention, assessment, early intervention and treatment of injuries and pain and the ongoing management of chronic musculoskeletal conditions.

1. What do Myotherapists Treat?

Myotherapists provide evidence-based assessment, treatment and rehabilitation for a wide range of musculoskeletal pain and associated conditions, for example:

  1. Back pain
  2. Neck and shoulder pain
  3. Headache
  4. Sports injuries
  5. Rotator cuff problems
  6. Occupational injuries
  7. Achilles tendinopathy and other ankle injuries
  8. Jaw pain and clicking
  9. Fibromyalgia and other chronic pain presentations
  10. Tennis elbow
  11. Post Surgery issues
  12. Knee pain
  13. Hip pain
  14. Fibromyalgia
  15. Chronic pain

You don’t need to be in pain to visit a Myotherapist. Once symptoms have settled treatment may focus on restoring optimal activity (rehabilitation), reducing the likelihood of further injury and keeping you moving and performing at your best.

2. Where do Myotherapists Treat?

Most myotherapists in Australia treat in private practice. Myotherapists may be in stand alone practices or integrated into multidisciplinary settings.

As primary health care providers, Myotherapists are skilfully trained to assist and aid in prevention, assessment, early intervention and treatment of injuries and pain and the ongoing management of chronic musculoskeletal conditions. Myotherapist skill set and treatment options for patients may include trigger point therapy, joint mobilisation, dry needling, cupping, stretching, exercise and rehabilitation programs, pain management and patient education.

Myotherapists often work in conjunction to other allied health practitioners to optimise patient outcomes and achieve long standing, sustainable results.

MyoActive Sports Medicine is one of the best myotherapy clinic in the south east suburbs, due to being able to actually get long term results.

At our clinic, we mainly focus on providing injury rehabilitation through various techniques of muscle strengthening and retraining.

We provide our services all around Melbourne and we have many clients from Glen Waverley, Mount Waverley, Burwood, Burwood East, Vermont, Forest Hill and more for Myotherapy services.

3. SIGNIFICANT FEATURES OF MYOTHERAPY

  • Expert myotherapists use their hands to provide manual therapy to the clients as per their individual need and pattern of pains.

  • Our highly qualified myotherapists use the techniques like myofascial release, joint mobilisation as well as soft tissue techniques.

  • We also provide education to individual clients for their pain and load management in their daily activities.

  • These techniques focus on proper rehabilitation at the end of the treatment to offer a long lasting relief to the clients.

  • These techniques are highly useful for pain and uneasiness in muscles, tissues, tendons, fascia and ligaments.

  • Aches and pains, reduced functional abilities and limited range of motion can be treated by myotherapists.

  • Myotherapy is a bachelor’s of health science (clinical myotherapy) degree which means it takes a minimum of 3 years study to become accredited.

We all know that myotherapy can have an impact on a patient’s biopsychosocial health. Our head myotherapist worked alongside the AFL and professional athletes to assist them in competiting at the highest level with minimal pain and/or discomfort.

Please leave a comment below if you have any questions or alternatively click on the links below.

If you’d like to know more about Myotherapy you may click here alternatively if you’d like to try Myotherapy and book an appointment click here.

Jayden Seracino | Director at MyoActive